Revisiting what centralized control of our maps looks like


#1

This is a thread to share historic proof of authorities or private interests manipulating location information to skew mass opinion.

Map manipulation could have malicious intent or stem from crude humor, but always a symptom of centralized control over the public’s understanding of what is where.

Although every map thus far straddles someplace in between objective and subjective, I’m curious to learn what sort of subjectivity has become now popularly condemnable.


#2

To kick this off, here are a few examples from Britain’s imperialist days and American political maps from the late 1800’s.

Every time I see examples like this, I wonder what sort of commonplace map manipulation I may be overlooking today lol.


#3

Great idea for a thread! Reminds me of this research I came across:


#4

source: https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:3293793

Throwing it back, in 1886 the British Empire created this map to celebrate their conquests and show the success of the state.

Britain’s self-glorifying aside, some part of me wishes we still had basemaps with this level of artistry.


#5

This’ll be a fun one: Contentious territory disputes!


#6

Territorial disputes have already occurred on the FOAM Map

also interesting article that is relevant


#7

Yup, seems like community consensus that some places will remain in flux on foam.

Cool point on paper maps. That last part in the article about celestial navigation is dope tho – I’d like to learn that.

It’s especially relevant in context with aviation – myself and greater pilot community definitely value paper charts as #1 to digital as #2.


#8

source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/08/30/mapbox-vandalism/

Can’t forget this map vandalism last year pushed to snapchat and other mapbox clients.

I know some folks at mapbox being pretty embarrassed about this since it was “in the manual part of the review process a human error led to this incident.”